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Source: New Zealand Goverment /covid19.govt.nz

01.07.2021

Quarantine-free travel from some Australian states will resume from 11.59pm (NZT) on 4 July.

This includes ACT, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria. Negative pre-departure tests will be required to enter New Zealand.

Travel

Advice on international travel, quarantine-free travel, what happens when you arrive in New Zealand, and how to safely travel within New Zealand.

Travel to New Zealand


How to plan your travel to New Zealand and what will happen when you arrive.

On this page


Who can travel to New Zealand

The New Zealand borders are closed to almost all travellers. Closed borders helps stop COVID-19 from spreading through our communities. The travel ban applies to all arrivals into New Zealand whether by air or sea.

New Zealand citizens and residents

You have a legal right to come to New Zealand if you’re:

  • a New Zealand citizen 
  • a New Zealand resident with valid travel conditions.

If you're travelling from a 'very high risk' country

Travel from very high risk countries is temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, partners and dependent children of New Zealand citizens, and parents of dependent children who are New Zealand citizens.

The following countries currently meet the threshold of being very high risk: India, Brazil, Papua New Guinea and Pakistan.

Restrictions on travel to New Zealand from very high risk countries

Limited exceptions

There are a small number of limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand.

These exceptions apply to people who: 

  • already hold a temporary New Zealand visa 
  • do not have a New Zealand visa. 

If you’re not a New Zealand citizen or resident you legally must get approval from Immigration New Zealand before travelling to New Zealand.

COVID-19 key updates from Immigration NZ(external link)

There are exceptions for people who can travel to New Zealand under a quarantine-free travel arrangement.

Our quarantine-free travel arrangements apply to the aviation (air) border only. Maritime (sea) borders are closed at this time.

Quarantine-free travel

There are also exceptions for some vessels. These include cargo ships, fishing vessels unloading catch and ships coming from Antarctica.

Guidance for the maritime sector from the Ministry of Health(external link)

 

Pre-departure testing if you're travelling to New Zealand

If you're travelling to New Zealand, you must have a negative COVID-19 test result before the scheduled departure of your first international flight. Travellers from Antarctica and most Pacific islands do not need to get pre-departure tests..

Travellers from Australia are required to get PCR or RT-PCR tests.

You will need to have had both your COVID-19 sample taken and your result returned no more than 72 hours before the scheduled departure time of your first international departure.

Check the requirements for pre-departure testing for travellers to New Zealand

 

Border controls on arrival

It's important people returning to New Zealand do their part to stop COVID-19 spreading in New Zealand.

Managed isolation or quarantine

If you're returning to New Zealand you legally must complete at least 14 days of managed isolation or quarantine, unless you're arriving under quarantine-free travel. You will also be tested for COVID-19 during your stay in a facility.

Managed isolation and quarantine

Secure your place in managed isolation

You are legally required to have a voucher before flying to New Zealand. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. 

Airlines will not be permitted to board you if you do not have a voucher, unless you are exempt from using the Managed Isolation Allocation System. 

Register for a voucher for managed isolation(external link)

 

Request an emergency allocation

The emergency allocation process exists for limited situations that require urgent travel to New Zealand within the next 14 days.

You can apply for an emergency allocation if you cannot book your preferred date in the Managed Isolation Allocation System, and you meet the eligibility criteria.

You can request an emergency allocation if:

  • you are legally entitled to enter New Zealand under our current border settings
  • your travel is time-critical — within the next 14 days
  • you have registered in the Managed Isolation Allocation System and you have not been able to book an allocation for the date you require urgent travel
  • your circumstances fall within 1 of the 2 categories permitted, and
  • you have attached evidence to support your application.

The managed isolation and quarantine website has details about the travel categories permitted for emergency allocation, and what supporting evidence you need.

Very few emergency allocation requests will be granted. We encourage you to book in early to the Managed Isolation Allocation System, as this is the best way to guarantee your place.

Emergency allocation requests(external link)

 

How to travel back to New Zealand

Many countries around the world have closed their borders and imposed stricter travel restrictions.

Check your options

Travel by air to New Zealand

Commercial flight options are available to return to New Zealand but are limited.

We recommend you contact your airline and other travel providers for the most up-to-date information about flight availability. Contact your travel agent or airline if you are travelling from or transiting through areas affected by border measures.

Travel by sea to New Zealand

Cruise ships continue to be banned from entering New Zealand.

Vessels can enter New Zealand if all aboard are New Zealand citizens or permanent residents. There are exceptions for some vessels. This includes cargo ships, fishing vessels unloading catch and ships coming from Antarctica.

Guidance for the maritime sector from the Ministry of Health(external link)

Visa information for critical workers in the maritime sector(external link)

In an emergency

 

If you are a New Zealand citizen abroad you can get emergency consular assistance. You can access support for situations like lost or stolen passports, death, health issues and law infringements.

New Zealand cannot influence or guarantee another country or airline’s entry, exit or transit requirements. We also cannot help you book a commercial flight.

Get emergency consular help by calling:

More help from SafeTravel(external link)

 

Quarantine-free travel to New Zealand

Quarantine-free travel allows you to travel to and enter countries that are participating in a quarantine-free travel arrangement without needing to enter managed isolation or quarantine when you arrive.

Australia

You can travel between Australia and New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility in either destination. The New Zealand Government could pause quarantine-free travel from Australia — make sure you check what is happening before you depart.  

Quarantine-free travel with Australia

Cook Islands and Niue

You can now travel from the Cook Islands or Niue to New Zealand without having to go into a managed isolation facility.

Quarantine-free travel is available in both directions for the Cook Islands, but just one way for Niue — from Niue to New Zealand. The Government is preparing for quarantine-free travel from New Zealand to Niue, but there is no date for this yet.

 

What to bring with you to New Zealand

You will not be able to go to the shops when you first arrive in New Zealand, or while you are in managed isolation or quarantine.

What to bring with you to New Zealand(external link)

 

Keep yourself and those around you safe while travelling

Keep yourself, your whānau and those around you safe while travelling to New Zealand.

In the 14 days before you leave

  • Avoid going to high-risk events like parties, social gatherings or crowded places.
  • Avoid contact with people who have COVID-19 or who are contacts of people with COVID-19.
  • Stay home as much as possible to limit your contact with other people.
  • Wash and dry your hands often, cough into your elbow and avoid touching your face.
  • Keep your distance from people you do not know.
  • Wear a face covering when you cannot keep your distance.

Doing these things will help reduce your risk of being exposed to COVID-19 and bringing it home with you.

 

Arriving in New Zealand

What happens when you arrive back in New Zealand depends on whether you arrive by air or sea.

Arriving in New Zealand and being transferred to a managed isolation or quarantine facility(external link)

Entering a managed isolation facility, and what to expect(external link)

Arriving by air

When you arrive by air, you will be screened for cold, flu or COVID-19 symptoms at the airport.

If you have symptoms or are waiting for the results of a test, you will go to a quarantine facility. Otherwise, you will go to a managed isolation facility.

Both types of facilities are in hotels.

Arriving by sea

When you arrive by sea, you may complete your isolation on your vessel.

 

Transiting through New Zealand

International transit through New Zealand

Quarantine-free travel


Information on travelling between New Zealand and some countries without having to enter a managed isolation facility when you arrive.


International travel and transit


Information about travelling to, leaving and transiting through New Zealand.


Pre-departure tests to enter New Zealand



Domestic travel


Information about travelling on public transport and in private vehicles, and travelling between regions.


New Zealanders overseas


Advice for New Zealanders overseas about how to travel to New Zealand, border controls when you arrive and registering with SafeTravel.


Foreign nationals in New Zealand


Advice for foreign nationals about how to get home, and what to do if you cannot get home.


Signs and posters for travelling safely


Download and print resources — including posters for wearing face coverings on transport and tracking your journey.


Further information: https://covid19.govt.nz/


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23.07.2020

Border restrictions


New Zealand’s borders are currently closed to almost all travellers to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

On this page

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    Border entry restrictions

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    Leaving New Zealand

  • Bullet chevron

    Transiting through New Zealand

Border entry restrictions

The New Zealand borders are closed for all but critical travel — protecting public health in New Zealand is paramount. The travel ban applies to all arrivals into New Zealand whether by air or sea.

New Zealand citizens and residents

You have a legal right to come home if you are:

  • a New Zealand citizen
  • a New Zealand resident with valid travel conditions.

You do not need approval from Immigration New Zealand before travelling.

Advice if you are planning to travel to New Zealand(external link)

Limited exceptions

There are a small number of limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. These exceptions apply to people who:

  • already hold a temporary New Zealand visa
  • don’t have a New Zealand visa.

If you’re not a New Zealand citizen or resident you legally must get approval from Immigration New Zealand before travelling to New Zealand.

List of exceptions from Immigration New Zealand(external link)

There are also exceptions for some vessels. These include cargo ships, fishing vessels unloading catch and ships coming from Antarctica.

Guidance for the maritime sector from the Ministry of Health(external link)

Managed isolation and quarantine

To help stop the spread of COVID-19, people who do arrive in New Zealand legally must complete at least 14 days of managed isolation or quarantine at an isolation facility. Returnees will also be tested for COVID-19 during their stay. 

About managed isolation and quarantine, and what to expect(external link)

 

Leaving New Zealand

Many borders around the world are closed to people who are not citizens and permanent residents of that country.

Advice if you are planning on leaving New Zealand 

 

Transiting through New Zealand

The New Zealand Government has transit arrangements with a number of countries to make it easier for each country’s citizens to get home. 

Transit agreements that say who may transit through New Zealand are published by Immigration New Zealand. 

We recommend you also check if you need to apply for a transit exemption from managed isolation.

Transit arrangements from Immigration New Zealand(external link)

Exemptions from managed isolation(external link)


Source: https://covid19.govt.nz/travel-and-the-border/

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07.04.2020

New Zealand is at COVID-19 alert Level 4, which includes severe restrictions on travel to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in New Zealand by reducing contact between people to the bare minimum and stopping all but essential travel. The restrictions do not apply to workers and operators involved in the delivery of essential goods (as defined in essential services list on the COVID-19 website) by road and rail freight. If there are non-essential goods blocking the movement of essential goods, then the non-essential goods can be moved to storage elsewhere. At this time, the distribution of non-essential goods is not permitted. Restrictions to do not apply to all personnel involved in the movement of freight by ship, internationally and domestically, when undertaking an essential service.  This includes the operation of ferries (e.g. the Cook Strait ferries) to move essential freight and essential workers.  Non-essential goods at a port be transported, only if: 1)if essential workers are already located at the port for the purpose of dealing with essential goods; and 2) if the movement of non-essential goods at the Port does not impact on the movement of essential goods or  the delivery of essential services at the Port; or 3) if the movement of non-essential goods are required to create space for essential goods and the movement of essential goods within the port and across the supply chain. In this instance, the non-essential goods are classified as essential for the purposes of moving them to an alternative storage facility.

Source: covid19.govt.nz




Source: WCO/New Zealand Customs Service

18.03.2020


New Zealand is taking strong action to contain the spread of Covid-19 and announced
measures on 16 March, which require all travelers to New Zealand, with the exception of
travelers from specific island countries, to self-isolate for a period of 14 days upon their arrival.
This action will help to protect New Zealanders from this pandemic.


However, even as we take action to preserve the health of our nation, New Zealand is taking
steps to ensure the continued flow of goods across our borders. To keep sea freight routes
open these border measures do not apply to cargo ships or marine crew. We are keeping the
border open for international supplies and our customs officers continue to be available to
facilitate the timely movement of goods across our border.


The leadership of the WCO at this time is critical in order to mitigate the impacts on supply
chains, and to ensure that critical supplies for medical, humanitarian and subsistence needs
continue to be available throughout the global community.


Further information: http://www.wcoomd.org/-/media/wco/public/global/pd....



Remarks from the International Road Transport Union

Forthcoming

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