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titleSource: Goverment of Canada / Gouvernement du Canada

13.10.2021

COVID-19: Travel, testing, quarantine and borders

Return or travel to Canada


Steps for fully vaccinated travellers



Other travellers




Testing and quarantine requirements




Travelling within Canada




Travelling outside Canada




Situation in Canada



___________________________________________________________________________

30.03.2021

https://travel.gc.ca/travel-covid/travel-restrictions/wizard-start

Find out if you can enter Canada

To limit the further spread of coronavirus in Canada, travel restrictions are in place across all ports of entry.




See the rules used to determine if you can enter Canada

This tool has been designed to give you an answer for the majority of reasons for entry into Canada. The rules are different for Canadians and foreign nationals.

Canadian citizens (including dual citizens), permanent residents, persons registered under the Indian Act, and protected person

Canadians with symptoms

If you’re a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada, a person registered under the Indian Act, or protected person, and you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should be able to enter Canada by land or by sea. You will not be able to board a public flight and enter by air if you have symptoms.

You must have a suitable place and plan to isolate. This is mandatory.

Canadians without symptoms

If you’re a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada, a person registered under the Indian Act, or protected persons, and you don’t have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you are able to enter Canada.

Unless you are exempt, you will need to follow the testing requirements for your method of entry:

You must have a suitable place and plan to quarantine. This is mandatory, unless your reason for entry is considered quarantine exempt.

Provincial and territorial requirements

You may have to comply with additional quarantine requirements make declarations of your arrival or other restrictions depending on which province or territory is your final destination.

Dual Canadian citizens

If you’re a dual Canadian citizen, you can only enter Canada with a:

Foreign nationals coming from the U.S. (including connections, so long as you enter Canada from the U.S.)

Temporary border restriction implemented on March 21, 2020 continues.

Foreigners with symptoms

If you’re a foreign national and you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you will not be able to enter Canada.

Foreigners without symptoms

You must have a suitable place and plan to quarantine. This is mandatory, unless your reason for entry is considered quarantine exempt. If you do not have a plan, you may be denied entry into Canada.

Unless you are exempt, you will need to follow the testing requirements for your method of entry:

No entry for optional reasons

A foreign national will be denied entry into Canada for discretionary (optional) reasons such as:

  • leisure, tourism, visiting friends
  • social gatherings, weddings
  • being a property owner in Canada

Entry for non-discretionary (non-optional) reasons

Foreigners entering from the U.S may only enter to:

Reunite with family in CanadaTravel for an essential or not discretionary (optional) reason

Transiting through Canada

You may be permitted to transit through Canada to reach another country.

For more information about flights, see Transit to another country by air.

Alaska and the rest of the United States

You will likely be permitted to transit across Canada, but there are several requirements to follow.

For more information, see Transit between Alaska and the rest of the United States

Canadian waters

You cannot enter Canadian waters for optional reasons. You may still navigate through international or Canadian waters while in transit.

For more information, see Transit through Canadian waters

Provincial and territorial requirements

You may have to comply with additional quarantine requirements, make declarations of your arrival or other restrictions depending on which province or territory is your final destination.

Foreign nationals who are coming directly from another country

Temporary border restriction implemented on March 21, 2020 continues.

Foreigners with symptoms

If you’re a foreign national and you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you will not be able to enter Canada.

Foreigners without symptoms

You must have a suitable place and plan to quarantine. This is mandatory, unless your reason for entry is considered exempt from quarantine. If you do not have a plan, you may be denied entry into Canada.

Unless you are exempt, you will need to follow the testing requirements for your method of entry:

No entry for optional reasons

A foreign national will be denied entry into Canada for any optional reason such as:

  • leisure, tourism, visiting friends
  • social gatherings, weddings
  • being a property owner in Canada

Entry is permitted only under certain travel exemptions

Even if you believe your reason for travel is an essential visit, you may only enter Canada to:

Reunite with family in CanadaTravel for a specific purpose that is permitted (travel exemption)

Transiting through Canada

You may be permitted to transit through Canada to reach another country.

For more information about flights, see Transit to another country by air.

Canadian waters

You cannot enter Canadian waters for optional reasons. You may still navigate through international and Canadian waters while in transit.

For more information, see Transit through Canadian waters

Provincial and territorial requirements

You may have to comply with additional quarantine requirements, make declarations of your arrival or other restrictions depending on which province or territory is your final destination.


Disclaimer: In addition to the temporary entry restriction in place due to COVID-19, foreign nationals must meet the entry requirements under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and provide appropriate travel and immigration documentation as necessary.


Source: https://travel.gc.ca/travel-covid/travel-restrictions/wizard-start


Info
titleSource: Transport Canada

02.10.2020

Government introduces new border measures to protect Canadian public health, provides update on travel restrictions

Quick facts


  • While Canadian citizens and Canadian permanent residents can travel to Canada, foreign nationals are subject to the travel restrictions.

  • The new measure for extended family members complements the updated rules for immediate family members announced on June 8, 2020, and will help families in Canada reunite with more of their loved ones.

  • All travellers must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Canada, unless they are exempt. Travellers may also seek approval for limited release from mandatory quarantine for compassionate reasons in specific situations where respecting the 14‑day mandatory quarantine period is not feasible, such as visiting a loved one who is critically ill.

  • All travellers to Canada are now required to provide specific information after entry into Canada, including contact information. They may also provide updates on symptoms through self‑assessment during their quarantine period. The ArriveCAN app is the recommended option for providing this information.

  • Travellers flying to Canada must pass a health check conducted by airlines before they will be allowed to board their flight. Upon arrival in Canada, a traveller’s health and ability to quarantine will be assessed before they leave the port of entry.

  • Any foreign national showing signs or symptoms of COVID‑19 will not be allowed to enter Canada. A border services officer will determine if a foreign national can enter the country.


Travel restrictions and exemptions – Who can and can’t travel to Canada


Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship......

_______________________________________________________________________________________________


10.09.2020

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Travel restrictions, exemptions and advice

On this page

Travellers entering Canada

To limit the spread of COVID-19, travellers entering Canada must follow the rules set out by the emergency orders under the Quarantine Act.

No one should travel when sick. Commercial airline restrictions may also prevent you from boarding your plane if you're sick. However, Canadians, persons with status under the Indian Act and permanent residents who have COVID-19 symptoms are allowed to return to Canada.

When entering Canada, you'll be:

  • asked if you have a cough, fever or difficulty breathing
  • required to acknowledge that you must:
    • quarantine for 14 days if you don't have symptoms or
    • isolate for 14 days if you have symptoms
  • asked if you have a suitable place to isolate or quarantine, where:
    • you'll have access to basic necessities, including water, food, medication and heat during the winter months
    • you won't have contact with people who:
      • are 65 years or older
      • have underlying medical conditions
      • have compromised immune systems
    • you won’t be in a group or community living arrangement
  • given instructions about the actions you must take under the emergency order and the penalties for non-compliance

Travellers entering Canada must:

  • provide traveller contact information through:
  • undergo screening by a border official
  • answer any relevant questions:
    • when you arrive in Canada
    • during your 14-day period while in quarantine or isolation

Government of Canada representatives at Canadian ports of entry will:

  • administer the emergency orders on behalf of the Public Health Agency of Canada
  • assess your potential risks to public health under the Quarantine Act
  • determine if you:
    • have suitable plans for quarantine or isolation
    • need to be transferred to a designated quarantine facility, if no other suitable options are available
    • have no symptoms of COVID-19 and can continue domestic travel to your place of quarantine

The information border officials collect helps the Public Health Agency of Canada with its compliance and enforcement efforts. Providing false or misleading information is an offence under the Quarantine Act and can result in fines and potentially prison time.

ArriveCAN app

Use this mobile app to speed up your arrival process in Canada and spend less time with border and public health officers. Submit your information easily and securely using the app within 48 hours before arriving in Canada. The app helps you to:

  • provide mandatory information that's required for entry into Canada
  • reduce your wait time and points of contact at the border
  • provide the Government of Canada with voluntary updates on your quarantine compliance and the development of any symptoms during the 14 days after arriving in Canada

Download the ArriveCAN app (iOS, Android or web format). Make sure you have the official version by downloading it here.

Border restrictions

If you're a foreign national (not a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada), you won't be able to enter Canada if you have COVID-19 symptoms.

There are currently border restrictions for discretionary (optional) travel to Canada:

Discretionary travel includes, but is not limited to, tourism, recreation and entertainment.

If a traveller's entry is permitted, they'll be subject to mandatory quarantine for 14 days.

Exemptions to border restrictions

There are no exemptions to border restrictions for compassionate reasons, such as visiting a critically ill loved one or attending a funeral.

You'll only be considered for an exemption to border restrictions at Canada's ports of entry if:

You don't require an interpretive letter from the Public Health Agency of Canada in order to be exempted from an emergency order.

If you've requested an interpretive letter for a future travel exemption, this letter would be taken into account. However, it wouldn't be considered a final decision for entry or for quarantine requirements.

A government representative at the border will determine if your reason for travelling to Canada can be considered for exemption under the emergency orders.

Foreign nationals arriving from the U.S. may be able to enter Canada for non-discretionary (non-optional) travel purposes.

Foreign nationals arriving from countries other than the U.S. may also be allowed to enter Canada. However, their travel must be non-discretionary (non-optional) and fall under exemptions set out in the emergency order. For example:

  • an immediate family member of a Canadian citizen or permanent resident who is travelling to be with an immediate family member and is planning to stay for a period of at least 15 days
    • foreign nationals who are allowed into Canada under this exemption must quarantine for 14 days

Being exempt from border restrictions does not mean you're exempt from other requirements, including:

  • mandatory quarantine
  • any additional public health requirements of the province or territory where you'll be quarantining and staying while in Canada

In some cases, your reason for travelling may be considered essential by a province, territory or under Canada's National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure. However, you'll only be given an exemption by the Government of Canada if your reason for travel is considered essential under the Quarantine Act's emergency orders.

Foreign nationals who meet an exemption to the border restrictions must still present the appropriate travel documents at the border. This includes citizenship documents or work permits. Government representatives will make the final decision on your entry to Canada at the port of entry.

For more information on the restrictions to enter Canada and the exemptions, consult the Canada Border Services Agency.

Mandatory quarantine or mandatory isolation

Before considering travelling, all travellers arriving in Canada must plan for their mandatory 14-day quarantine period, which starts on the date they arrive. Government of Canada representatives will conduct health screenings at the time of entry to Canada and let you know if you need to quarantine or isolate.

If you don't have COVID-19 symptoms, you must quarantine for 14 days while you're still at risk of developing symptoms and infecting others.

If you have COVID-19 symptoms, you must isolate for 14 days. The only people who may enter Canada if they have COVID-19 or any symptoms of COVID-19 are:

  • Canadians
  • persons with status under the Indian Act
  • permanent residents

Isolation instructions for travellers with COVID-19 symptoms returning to Canada

All travellers entering Canada, whether in mandatory quarantine or isolation, must:

  • arrange for a suitable place to quarantine or isolate, within your financial means
  • go directly to your place of quarantine or isolation, without stopping anywhere
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while travelling to the place where you'll quarantine or isolate
  • stay at your place of quarantine or isolation for 14 days (only leave to seek medical assistance if needed)
  • not have any guests
  • monitor your health for fever and a cough, or fever and difficulty breathing
  • follow all other guidance provided by your local public health authority

You’re strongly urged to make housing arrangements for quarantine or isolation before you arrive in Canada. In most cases, this can be in your own home or in the same place you’re visiting in Canada.

If this isn't possible, you should consider making alternative arrangements that are within your own financial means. A suitable place is one where you:

  • won’t have contact with people who are vulnerable, such as those who:
    • are 65 years or older
    • have underlying medical conditions
    • have compromised immune systems
  • aren’t in a group living environment
  • can stay for at least 14 days (and possibly longer)
  • have access to basic necessities, including water, food, medication and heat during the winter months

Exceptions to staying with a vulnerable person include if:

  • they’re a consenting adult
  • they’re either the parent or the minor in a parent-minor relationship

Before you travel, you must plan to quarantine or isolate in a suitable place. If you don’t, you may be assessed further. If you can’t quarantine in your own home, consider other options within your financial means, such as:

  • hotel
  • motel
  • other paid housing
  • friends or family, as long as you won’t expose anyone who:
    • is not part of your travel group 
    • is at risk of more severe outcomes of COVID-19

If no other options are available, travellers may be referred to a designated quarantine facility as a last resort. This decision will be made by a government representative at the border.

After you arrive in Canada, a representative of the Government of Canada will call you to monitor compliance with your mandatory quarantine or isolation. We ask that you please answer calls from 1-888-336-7735.

Travellers who need medical testing or treatment while in quarantine or isolation

If you need to seek testing or medical treatment, you must:

  • immediately return to your place of quarantine or isolation location afterwards
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while in transit

We also recommended that you contact your local public health authority and follow any additional instructions they provide.

Travellers with symptoms (mandatory isolation)

No one should travel when sick. Commercial airline restrictions may also prevent you from boarding your plane if you're sick. However, Canadians, persons with status under the Indian Act and permanent residents who have COVID-19 symptoms are allowed to return to Canada.

If you arrive in Canada with symptoms of COVID-19, let a border official know. A Government of Canada representative will then be contacted to assess your situation. If you need it, they'll help you get medical care.

Foreign nationals won’t be allowed to enter Canada if they have COVID-19 or any symptoms of COVID-19.

In addition to the steps described above for mandatory quarantine or isolation, if you have symptoms of COVID-19 you must also:

  • use private transportation (such as your own vehicle) to get to your place of isolation
  • wear a suitable non-medical mask or face covering while in transit
  • practise physical distancing at all times
  • not go outside, including private outdoor spaces, like backyards or balconies, at your place of isolation

If your symptoms get worse during your isolation period, contact your local public health authority and follow their instructions.

Isolation instructions for travellers with COVID-19 symptoms returning to Canada

Travellers without symptoms (mandatory quarantine)

If you're in mandatory quarantine and have no COVID-19 symptoms, you may use a private outdoor space if your place of quarantine has one. This means one that’s not shared with anyone else.

Avoid contact with those who:

  • are 65 years or older
  • have underlying medical conditions
  • have compromised immune systems

You may only quarantine with somebody from the above group if:

  • they consent to the quarantine or are the parent or minor in a parent-minor relationship
  • you complete a form provided by a government representative at the port of entry explaining the consent and receive authorization to proceed

If you develop COVID-19 symptoms within your 14-day quarantine period:

  • isolate yourself from others immediately
  • contact your public health authority and follow their instructions
  • extend your quarantine to 14 days from the day your symptoms developed

Quarantine instructions for travellers without symptoms of COVID-19 returning to Canada

Exemptions to mandatory quarantine

There are no exemptions from mandatory quarantine for:

  • compassionate reasons, such as visiting a critically ill loved one or attending a funeral
  • travellers entering Canada who have tested negative for COVID-19
    • this is because a negative test for COVID-19 doesn't prove that a traveller is COVID-19 free
  • travellers entering Canada who have recovered from COVID-19
    • this is because there’s potential risk of re-infection and it's not yet certain how long the virus is contagious

If you don’t have symptoms of COVID-19 and you’re a member of one of the exempt classes of persons listed in the mandatory isolation order, then you don’t have to meet federal quarantine requirements, but are required to respect the intent of the order in addition to any provincial and local requirements. This exemption from federal quarantine requirements includes, with conditions, persons who perform an essential job or function, as described in the order.

You don't require an interpretive letter from the Public Health Agency of Canada in order to be exempted from an emergency order.

If you've requested an interpretive letter for a future travel exemption, this letter would be taken into account. However, it wouldn't be considered a final decision for entry or for quarantine requirements.

A government representative at the border will determine if your reason for travelling to Canada can be considered for exemption under the emergency orders.

If you're exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement, you must still:

  • monitor your health for COVID-19 symptoms
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while in public settings if physical distancing can't be maintained
  • follow public health guidance and prevention measures from your local health authority and your employer

Isolate yourself from others right away if you develop COVID-19 symptoms and contact your local public health authority for further instruction.

Employers of exempt workers should conduct active daily monitoring of their staff for COVID-19 symptoms, checking for cough, fever or shortness of breath. Use the risk assessment tool for workplaces and businesses for more guidance.

Compliance and enforcement

Violating any instructions provided to you when you entered Canada or failing to provide accurate information is an offence under the Quarantine Act and could lead to up to:

  • 6 months in prison and/or
  • $750,000 in fines

If you choose to break your mandatory quarantine or isolation, resulting in the death or serious bodily harm to another person, you could face:

  • a fine of up to $1,000,000 or
  • imprisonment of up to 3 years or
  • both

The Contraventions Act has been changed to give police (including the RCMP, provincial and local police) more power to enforce the Quarantine Act. They can issue tickets to people who don't comply with the act or the emergency orders. Fines range from $275 to $1,000.

Travellers within Canada

As of March 30, 2020, all airline passengers in Canada will be subject to a health check prior to boarding. You won't be able to board if you:

  • show any symptoms of COVID-19
  • are subject to a provincial or local public health order
  • have been refused boarding in the past 14 days due to a medical reason related to COVID-19

If you weren't allowed on a flight because you had COVID-19 symptoms, you can't board any other flight until:

  • 14 days have passed and you no longer have symptoms or
  • you present a medical certificate confirming that your symptoms aren't related to COVID-19

Travellers within Canada may be subject to additional provincial, territorial and local public health measures at your final destination. In addition, they may be exempted from provincial or territorial border restrictions within Canada if their reason for travelling within Canada is to provide support to a business that's considered essential:

  • by Public Safety Canada
  • within a province or territory

Travellers departing Canada

Canadian citizens and permanent residents are advised to avoid all non-essential travel outside of Canada until further notice to limit the spread of COVID-19.

The best way to protect yourself, your family and those most at risk of severe illness from COVID-19 in our communities is to choose to stay in Canada. Contact your airline or tour operator to determine options for cancelling or postponing your trip.

Many countries have put in place travel or border restrictions, such as movement restrictions and quarantines. Many airlines have reduced or suspended flights and many airports have closed.

These restrictions are changing quickly and may be imposed by countries with little warning. Your travel plans may be severely disrupted. Should you choose to take non-essential travel outside Canada, you may be forced to remain outside of Canada longer than expected.

It's important to remember that if you choose to travel abroad:

  • your trip may become much longer than you planned
  • you may have reduced access to quality health care
  • you could be subject to the measures of other countries

If you're still considering travel outside of Canada, you should:

  • understand the risks to your safety and security abroad
  • check the pandemic travel health notice before travelling
  • know the health risks and travel restrictions and requirements for your destination
  • make sure you have enough money and necessities, including medication, in case your travel is disrupted

Protect yourself and others

If you must travel or are already outside Canada, get the latest advice and information for your safety and security.

During your trip:

  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering when physical distancing can't be maintained
  • cough and sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm
  • be aware of the local situation and follow local public health advice
  • take precautions against respiratory illnesses, which includes:
    • avoiding contact with sick people
    • avoiding large crowds or crowded areas
  • wash your hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds
    • if none is available, use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol

If you feel sick during your flight or upon arrival:

  • seek medical attention
  • look for messaging on airport screens to guide you
  • inform the flight attendant or a border services officer

When travelling outside Canada, expect increased health screening measures at points of entry for international destinations, including airports and land borders. Local authorities may impose control measures suddenly, including movement restrictions such as quarantines.

Leaving Canada while in mandatory quarantine or isolation

No one should travel when sick. Commercial airline restrictions may also prevent you from boarding your plane if you're sick.

If you arrive in Canada and have started your 14-day mandatory quarantine or isolation period but then have to leave the country before this period ends, you must:

  • continue to quarantine or isolate until you depart Canada
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while around others
  • get permission and follow the instructions laid out by a quarantine officer (for people in isolation only)

Avoid all travel on cruise ships outside Canada

Canada is advising Canadian citizens and permanent residents to avoid all travel on cruise ships outside Canada until further notice.

Cruise passengers include travellers from around the world who may be arriving from areas with known or unknown spread of COVID-19. The virus can spread quickly on board cruises due to the close contact between passengers. Older people and people with a weakened immune system or underlying medical conditions are at a higher risk of developing severe disease.

Cruise ship outbreaks of COVID-19 indicate that a large number of individuals onboard can become infected.

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, many countries outside of Canada have put policies and restrictions in place to contain the global outbreak. These restrictions may impact a cruise traveller's:

  • itinerary
  • ability to disembark
  • access to health care

If an outbreak of COVID-19 occurs on your cruise ship while you are outside of Canada:

  • you could be subject to quarantine procedures onboard ship or in a foreign country
  • the range of consular services available to those on cruise ships may be significantly restricted by local authorities, especially in situations of quarantine
  • you must quarantine for 14 days upon your return to Canada

The Government of Canada isn’t planning additional repatriation flights to bring Canadians home during the COVID-19 pandemic. If an outbreak of COVID-19 occurs on your cruise ship while you’re outside of Canada, our ability to help may be limited. Your options to return to Canada may also be limited due to decreased availability of flights.

For information on domestic cruises and passenger vessels, refer to the following:

Non-medical masks or face coverings while travelling

All air travellers, with some exceptions, are required to wear a non-medical mask or face covering while travelling.

The following people should not wear a mask:

  • children under 2 years old
  • people who need help to remove a mask
  • people who provide a medical certificate certifying that they’re unable to wear a face mask for a medical reason

You may also be required to wear a non-medical mask or face covering on other modes of transportation that are federally regulated. Before you travel, check to see how transportation measures affect your plans and what you need to pack.

Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/latest-travel-health-advice.html

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

30.07.2020

COVID-19 measures, updates, and guidance for road issued by Transport Canada

General information and news releases

Guidance for road industry

Other COVID-19 related resources

Detailed information

Aviation

Guidance, exemptions, safety alerts and bulletins for the air industry during the COVID-19 pandemic

Marine Transportation

Guidance, interim orders and ship safety bulletins for the marine industry during the COVID-19 pandemic 

Road Transportation

Guidance for the road industry during the COVID-19 pandemic

Rail Transportation

Guidance, orders and temporary exemptions for the rail industry during the COVID-19 pandemic

Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Temporary certificates and transporting requirements for transporting dangerous goods during the COVID-19 pandemic


Source: Transport Canada

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

28.07.2020

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Current border measures and requirements

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is committed to the safety and security of Canadians. This section offers resources and information about how we continue to facilitate the flow of legitimate travel and trade during the current global pandemic.

Most requested


Services and information

Canadians and permanent residents

Travel restrictions, border measures, enforcing the Quarantine Act.

Non-Canadians

Entry restrictions and exemptions, border services and more.

Business

Customs notices and changes for importers and exporters, open ports of entry.

Changes to travel-related programs and services

NEXUS/FAST enrollment centres and lane closures, processing delays, reduction of services.

Open ports of entry

Certain air, marine and land borders are temporarily closed.


Contact us

Source: https://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/services/covid/menu-eng.html

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

11.06.2020

COVID-19 information for the transportation industry

Information for the transportation industry

Pandemics cannot be stopped by one level of government alone. They know no border and do not respect provincial/territorial lines. In a country like Canada, where responsibilities are divided, collaboration between all levels of government is key.

The Government of Canada is working with provinces, territories, industry, and communities to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 within the transportation industry and communities.

In early June, the Minister of Transport introduced new measures for the use of face coverings in the Canadian transportation sector.

Many transportation workers are essential to deliver goods and get people from point A to point B. Public Safety Canada has developed Guidance on Essential Services and Functions in Canada During the COVID-19 Pandemic, which identifies essential workers in transportation. Each province and territory also has its own list of essential workers or businesses in transportation.

Aviation

Air operations in Canada

Canada is the world’s third-largest aviation market, with 18 million km2 of airspace managed by NAV CANADA.  In 2018, 6.5 million aircraft movements took place at airports, 3.7 million of which were made by airlines. General aviation companies made the other 2.8 million, which were itinerant and local (other commercial, private and government).

Managing the onboarding process

Transport Canada issued guidance for managing air travellers, including managing the onboarding process for flights departing from a Canadian aerodrome, U.S. transborder airports and international airports.

More information

Marine

Marine operations in Canada

The marine transportation sector provides a vital service to all Canadians in ensuring the safe movement of goods (food, medicine, supplies to health care sector, and other essential products) and people. It is also important for resupply and as a transportation link, playing a vital role for coastal and island communities.

Commercial shipping vessels and at ports

Canada’s ports play a key role in the economy and international trade. The marine transportation sectors on the Pacific, Atlantic and Arctic coasts are prepared for the higher risks posed by COVID-19.

We have created a poster [PDF] and a guide [PDF] showing how the marine community can keep employees safe, while moving goods safely and efficiently through our ports.

We have also introduced these measures for marine industry workers:

In addition, guidance is included to help employees determine when to wear face coverings at work.

If a ship heading to Canada has a presumptive or confirmed case of COVID-19

Read the Special Marine Security Notification Bulletin 2020-007 on COVID-19, which explains the responsibilities in these cases.

Also read WHO Operational Considerations for Managing COVID-19 Cases/Outbreak on Board Ships

Working at Transport Canada-owned public ports

Please see the list of public ports owned by Transport Canada. Public ports are following the guidance of their local health authorities.

Canada Port Authorities

Canada’s Port Authorities have also put measures in place. Please check with them for any procedures they put in place. Refer to the guide on keeping marine workers safe at ports [PDF].

Ferries and passenger vessels

We have introduced measures for cruise ships and other passenger vessels that:

More information

Rail

Railway operations in Canada

Canada’s rail operations help sustain nearly every part of the Canadian economy, including our manufacturing, agricultural, natural resource, wholesale and retail sectors, transit, and tourism.

The passenger rail sector provides commuter, intercity and tourist transportation services. Passenger rail is either federally or provincially regulated. 

Freight and passenger railway companies

Transport Canada has provided railway companies under federal jurisdiction guidance on face covering for when physical distancing cannot be maintained or when local authorities require it. We strongly recommend that companies:

  • make sure that workers have or have access to a personal face covering
  • use a risk-based approach to decide which workers should wear the face covering, or when local authorities require it.

More information

Road

Road operations in Canada

Road transportation is the dominant mode for moving both freight and passengers across Canada. Trucking is the primary form of freight transportation. Our country is linked from the Pacific to Atlantic coasts by a network of connecting highways anchored by the Trans-Canada Highway. Canada also has extensive road networks across its southern, more populated areas.

Keeping commercial drivers safe

Truck drivers move all of the essential products Canadians depend on, including all the medical and sanitation supplies to combat the spread of this virus. They also move emergency relief and food products, as well as materials used to manufacture and process essential goods, the fuels that move them, and a multitude of other items the supply chain depends on.

As an essential service, the trucking industry knows it’s being counted on to make sure that goods are being safely transported. In line with this, the Canadian Trucking Alliance has issued a Resource Document for the Canadian Trucking Industry [PDF].

Transport Canada, in collaboration with PHAC and Employment and Social Development Canada, developed guidance to protect drivers and employees working in commercial vehicle operations: Federal safety guidance to protect drivers and limit the spread of COVID-19 in commercial vehicle operations.

To help commercial vehicle drivers to choose and correctly use different types of personal protective equipment (PPE), we’ve also issued a guidance document: Personal Protective Equipment and their Use by Commercial Drivers

More information


Source: https://tc.canada.ca/en/initiatives/covid-19-measures-updates-guidance-issued-transport-canada/covid-19-information-transportation-industry

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titleSource: WCO/Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

31.03.2020

The annex  provides an example of communication material that the CBSA is using to share information with its commercial and industry stakeholders during this time.


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titleSource:WCO/Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

31.03.2020

The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic on March 11, 2020, prompting Canada to implement the following responsive measures:

  • On March 16, 2020, Canada announced new restrictions to ban the entry of foreign nationals by air travel from all countries except the US. Canada also issued a customs notice for the relief of duty and tax for imported goods required for an emergency by Canadian health care centres and emergency responders.

  • On March 19, 2020, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) began providing a 45 business days grace period for imported goods requiring account declarations. The CBSA is suspending late accounting penalties released on minimum documentation from the period of 11 March to 14 May 2020. This grace period will be reviewed as the situation evolves.

  • On 20 March 2020, Canada further announced restrictions to prohibit the entry of foreign nationals into Canada if they arrive from a foreign country other than the United States.

  • On 20 March 2020, in collaboration with our U.S. partners, as a part of Canada’s effort toprevent the spread of COVID-19 while safeguarding global supply chain continuity, Canada announced that, effective 21 March 2020, persons providing essential commercial services while in Canada (ex. truck drivers) as part of the global supply chain may enter Canada if they do not exhibit COVID-19 symptoms. Persons exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms are prohibited from entering Canada. Non-essential travel, including tourism, has also been prohibited.

  •  On 27 March 2020, Canada began allowing businesses to defer payments of the Goods and Services Tax / Harmonized Sales Tax amounts collected on their sales, as well as customs duties owing to their imports until 30 June 2020. Importers must still submit accounting declarations within the required timelines.

    While these important initiatives will serve to curtail the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada is particularly mindful of the need to maintain coordinated regional and international action to ensure the integrity of global trade supply chains.

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The US-Canada land border serves as an economic engine that supports over $1.7 billion (USD) dollars in daily cross-border trade. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States and Canada are temporarily restricting all non-essential travel across its borders. In each of our countries, we are encouraging people to exercise caution by avoiding unnecessary contact with others. This collaborative and reciprocal measure is an extension of that prudent approach.

“Non-essential” travel includes travel that is considered tourism or recreational in nature.

The United States and Canada recognize it is critical we preserve supply chains between both countries. These supply chains ensure that food, fuel, and life-saving medicines reach people on both sides of the border. Supply chains, including trucking, will not be impacted by this new measure. Americans and Canadians also cross the land border every day to do essential work or for other urgent or essential reasons, and that travel will not be impacted.

This decision will be implemented on March 21, 2020, at which time the US and Canada will temporarily restrict all non-essential travel across the US-Canada land border. The measure will be in place for 30 days, at which point it will be reviewed by both parties.





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titleRemarks from the International Road Transport Union

17.04.2020

The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) was informed on 15 April, by the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA), that the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is directing the agency, effective immediately, to implement a policy requiring all essential workers crossing the border to wear a non-medical mask or face covering and to provide drivers with a mask should they not have one.

CBSA informed CTA that no drivers will be turned away from entering Canada as a result of this policy and CBSA will be attempting to provide drivers with a mask, should they not have one.

The direction from the PHAC also states all travellers arriving in Canada will be required to wear a non-medical mask or face covering to proceed to their final destination, where they will isolate or quarantine.

Source: Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA)