Page tree

Versions Compared

Key

  • This line was added.
  • This line was removed.
  • Formatting was changed.
Info
titleSource: GOV.UK

22.09.2020

Entering the UK

Contents

  1. Coronavirus (COVID-19) and entering or returning to the UK
  2. What else happens when you arrive
  3. Before you leave for the UK
  4. At border control
  5. Baggage checks
  6. Layovers and transiting through a UK airport

Coronavirus (COVID-19) and entering or returning to the UK

If you’re a resident or visitor travelling to the UK from any country, you must provide your journey and contact details. If you do not do this before you arrive it might take you longer to enter the UK.

You’ll also need to self-isolate in the place you’re staying for the first 14 days after you arrive, unless you’re travelling from certain countries or territories.

You may be fined up to £100 if you refuse to provide your contact details. You may be fined more if you break this rule more than once. You may also be fined up to £1,000 if you refuse to self-isolate, or you could face further action.

There are different self-isolation rules and penalties depending on whether you are travelling to:

When you do not need to self-isolate

You may not need to self-isolate for 14 days if you’re travelling from some countries or territories.

You still have to provide your journey and contact details.

These countries or territories are different depending on whether you’re travelling to:

You’ll still need to self-isolate if you’ve visited or made a ‘transit stop’ in the previous 14 days in any country that is not on the list. A ‘transit stop’ is a stop where passengers can get on or off a coach, ferry, train or plane. Your ticket should say if a stop is a transit stop.

The 14 days begin from the date you left that country.

When you do not need to provide your details or self-isolate in the UK

You do not need to complete the form or self-isolate if you’re travelling from one of the following places, and you were there for 14 days or more:

  • Ireland
  • the Channel Islands
  • the Isle of Man

There are other reasons why you might not need to complete the form or self-isolate. Read the list of who does not need to complete the form or self-isolate.

What else happens when you arrive

Your passport or identity card will be checked when you arrive at a UK port or airport to make sure you’re allowed to come into the country. It should be valid for the whole of your stay.

You may also need a visa to come into or travel through the UK, depending on your nationality.

What you can bring with you depends on where you’re travelling from. You must declare to customs:

You and your baggage may be checked for anything you must declare.


Before you leave for the UK

Check what documents you’ll need to enter the UK.

You’re from an EEA country or Switzerland

You can enter the UK with either a valid passport or national identity card issued by an EEA country.

You’re not from an EEA country

You must have a valid passport to enter the UK. It should be valid for the whole of your stay.

You may also need a visa, depending on which country you’re from.

Check if you need a visa to enter the UK.

You may also need a visa if you’re ‘transiting’ or travelling through the UK, for example you’re changing flights at a UK airport.

Applying for a visa

You must apply for your visa before you arrive in the UK.

Travelling with children

You may be asked at the border to prove the relationship between yourself and any children travelling with you, if you do not seem to be the parent, for example if you have a different surname.

You can prove this with:

  • a birth or adoption certificate showing your relationship with the child
  • divorce or marriage certificates if you’re the parent but have a different surname from the child
  • a letter from the child’s parent giving permission for the child to travel with you and providing contact details, if you’re not the parent

Before you board

Your ‘carrier’ (for example airline or transport provider) will check your passport and other travel documents. They’ll send this information electronically to Border Force.

You can ask to see the information about you that’s been sent by carriers. You’ll have to pay a £10 fee.


At border control

Your passport or identity card will be checked.

You must:

  • have your passport or identity card ready - remove it from a holder or wallet if you use one
  • remove your sunglasses if you’re wearing them
  • move through passport control together if you’re in a family

Arriving by bus or coach

You have to leave the bus when you arrive at border control.

Make sure you:

  • are ready to get off the bus when you arrive
  • have your travel documents ready

Read the guidance for school parties and groups coming to the UK by coach.

If you’re from an EEA country or Switzerland

You can use the EU/EEA channel to get your passport or identity card checked - this is usually faster than the other channels.

The EEA includes the EU countries and also Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway.

You can use automatic ePassport gates at some airports if your passport has a ‘chip’ on it and you’re 12 or over. If you’re between 12 and 17, you must be accompanied by an adult.

These gates use facial recognition technology to check your identity against the photo in your passport.

If you’re from a non-EEA country

You no longer have to fill in a landing card. Your passport (and visa if you have one) will be checked at border control. You’ll usually be asked why you’re coming to the UK.

Because of coronavirus (COVID-19) there are changes at border control. You cannot currently use the automatic ePassport gates if you’re from any non-EEA country.

You should see a border control officer and follow the UK/EEA immigration lanes if you’re from:

  • Australia
  • Canada
  • Japan
  • New Zealand
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • United States

When else you must see a border control officer

You must see a border control officer and get a stamp in your passport if you’re from a non-EEA country and entering the UK:

  • on a short term study visa up to 6 months
  • with a Tier 5 Creative or Sporting certificate of sponsorship for up to 3 months (and you want to enter without a visa)
  • on a permitted paid engagement
  • to accompany or join your EEA family member

You cannot get a stamp if you use the ePassport gates. Without a stamp you will not be allowed to carry out the activities you came to the UK to do.

Registered Travellers

You should see a border control officer and use the UK/EEA channels.

Because of coronavirus (COVID-19) there are changes at border control. You cannot currently use the automatic ePassport gates.

Travelling with a UK biometric residence permit

You’ll have a biometric residence permit if your fingerprints were taken when you applied.

Your fingerprints will be checked at border control - they’ll be checked against the ones stored on your visa document.

If you’re joining or travelling with an EEA or Swiss family member

You should see a border control officer instead of using the automatic ePassport gates.

If you’re refused entry

You’ll be told in writing:

  • why you’ve been refused entry to the UK
  • if you can appeal against the decision
  • when you will be removed from the UK

You’ll usually have to leave the UK immediately.

You may be allowed into the UK temporarily (usually for up to a week) but your passport will be taken from you and you must report to immigration officers at set times.

Baggage checks

You must co-operate if you’re stopped and asked about your baggage.

If you break the rules your goods and any vehicle you use to transport them may be seized.

If your baggage is checked

Your baggage is usually checked in front of you.

Customs officers keep a record of:

  • all baggage they open and check
  • any damage to your baggage or belongings during a check

If your things are damaged

You may be offered compensation if your baggage or belongings are damaged during a customs check.

Making a complaint

You can:

Layovers and transiting through a UK airport

Passing through a UK airport while on the way to another country is called ‘transiting’. Some travellers call it a ‘layover’.

There are 2 types of transiting:

  • ‘airside’ - you do not pass through UK border control before you leave on your connecting journey
  • ‘landside’ - you do pass through UK border control, but come back through it and leave the UK within a short amount of time (usually 24 hours)

Find out if you need a UK visa for your layover.

Announcements

Freight, bus and road transport businesses


Source: https://www.gov.uk/uk-border-control/print

             https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus


Info
titleSource: WCO/Her Majesty Revenue and Customs

23.04.2020

The Covid-19 outbreak is the biggest public health emergency in a generation. The United
Kingdom (UK) is doing everything it can to tackle the pandemic and mitigate its impact.
The UK has already taken several steps. These include reducing dwell times for shipments
to allow for quicker permission to progress, assessing the need for personnel to be on site if
such functions can be discharged remotely and changes to site opening hours to allow for
greater facilitation.


We have also introduced the use of email in lieu of postal applications for authorisations to
reduce cross contamination and viral spread and we are allowing the use of estimated
figures for the completion of supplementary declarations.


We are advising traders, their agents and relevant government agencies to exchange
documents electronically. This can be by email, fax or digital photograph. Traders may also
apply for their existing authorisations to apply to additional locations. We will also be
publishing online an exhaustive list of government agencies at the border and their email
addresses and contact details.


We have also taken a number of measures in relation to transit movements. These include
goods moving under transit procedures being taken directly to any approved Temporary
Storage Facility even if the facility is not located with a Transit Office of Departure.


Providing relief from import duties (customs and import VAT) for medical equipment to assist
in the fight against Covid-19 has been a key part of the UK response. We have also
activated our disaster relief clearance route to allow for faster clearance through the ports of
goods to combat Covid-19.


The Chancellor has announced an unprecedented package of support for businesses. This
includes enhanced Time to Pay arrangements, £330 billion worth of government-backed and
guaranteed loans and a workers’ support package. VAT registered businesses can also
defer their domestic VAT payments due with their VAT returns between now and the end of
June and will have until the end of the financial year to pay the VAT due.


These changes have been published on the Gov.uk site and we have interacted with trade
bodies to maximise the distribution to businesses across the country. Please follow these
links to the relevant guidance:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/moving-goods-through-customs-during-the-coronavirus-covid19
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/customs-authorisations-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19
https://www.gov.uk/difficulties-paying-hmrc

Info
titleSource: European Commission

08.04.2020

Information about travel restrictions and impact on transport

The UK Department for Transport has sent a letter outlining COVID-19 response actions that are being taken in relation to road transport: 

https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/transport/files/uk-actions-road-tra...

Further information: 
https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/transport/files/uk_covi...

________________________________________________________________

16.03.2020

Temporary and limited relaxation of the enforcement of driving and rest times for the drivers of vehicles transporting essential goods

The UK has notified to a temporary and limited relaxation of the enforcement of driving and rest times for the drivers of vehicles transporting essential goods. This relaxation is granted pursuant to Article 14(2) of Regulation (EC) No 561/2006 and the purpose of this document is to notify the Commission accordingly. It will apply to those drivers involved in the delivery of food, non-food (personal care and household paper and cleaning) and over the counter pharmaceuticals when undertaking certain journeys in England, Scotland and Wales.

Start date: 18.03.2020

End date: 16.04.2020

Further information: https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/transport/files/temporary-relaxatio...


Source: https://ec.europa.eu/transport/coronavirus-response_en




Note
iconfalse
titleRemarks from the International Road Transport Union

24.09.2020

Update on Flash info posted on 17 September 2020; 15:30.

Operation Stack on the M20 has been deployed again today as a result of the strike action in Calais.

Source: RHA

                                                                                                          

17.09.2020

Operation Stack (Stage 1) has been implemented on the M20 between J8 - J9 coast-bound. The Operation is designed to prevent gridlock while anti-terrorism checks are in place.

All freight traffic heading for the Port of Dover or Channel Tunnel must join Operation Stack at J8 of the M20, where it will be separated into two queues on either side of the coast-bound carriageway.

All non-freight traffic will leave the M20 at J8 to join the A20 and follow the diversion signs with yellow circles.

The coast-bound diversion route for non-freight traffic will be M20 J8 - A20 Ashford Road - A20 Maidstone Road Drovers Roundabout - A28 Templar Way - A28 Chart Road - B2229 Brookfield Road - A2042 Romney Marsh Road - A2070- M20 J10 - A20 Hythe Road - M20 J11.
Link to map: http://moorl.uk/?1xidwpl

Non-freight traffic and tourist traffic travelling to east Kent are also advised to use the A2 and M2 to reduce congestion on the A20 diversion route.

Freight traffic travelling to East Kent, but not heading for the Channel Tunnel or Channel Ports is also advised to use the A2 and M2.

Please expect delays across the county and allow extra time for your journey.


Source: RHA

                                                                                                          

02.09.2020

In order to prepare effectively for Brexit, Dutch stakeholders involved in Brexit, including TLN, have launched a mini-campaign to inform the public of the procedures for transport to the United Kingdom from 1 Janaury 2021.

Digital pre-notification of customs documents will be mandatory at all ferry terminals and most short-sea terminals. Without this pre-notification, trucks will not be allowed to enter the ferry terminal and will be diverted to parking areas. 

Attached you will find information in English and German and a YouTube video on how transport to the United Kingdom will work from 1 January 2021.

Dutch website with information on Brexit:

  • A short outline of the five steps to be taken:

View file
name20200831-get-ready-for-brexiten.pdf
height250

Source: TLN

                                                                                                          

14.08.2020

More countries have been removed from the UK Travel Corridor list, this includes France and the Netherlands.

To re-iterate, international drivers who are actively engaged in cross border work ARE exempt from the requirement to isolate, but must still carry the evidence of their status, community authorisation, consignment note and COVID movement documents.

International drivers who have been on holiday and returning to the UK from a country that has been removed (or is not on the list) after 4am Saturday 15th August, WILL have to follow the rules and isolate.  Their tourist/holiday maker status supersedes their driver status.

Also, don’t forget that the UK Passenger Contact Locator form STILL needs to be completed by ALL returning to the UK.  https://www.gov.uk/provide-journey-contact-details-before-travel-uk

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-travel-corridors

The following countries and territories will be removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 15 August 2020:

•             Aruba

•             France

•             Malta

•             Monaco

•             the Netherlands

•             Turks and Caicos Islands

 

Source: RHA

                                                                                                          


06.07.2020

On 6 July, the UK Home Office published the list of travel corridors from which people arriving into the UK will not have to isolate for 14 days upon arrival, unless they have visited or stopped in any other country or territory in the preceding 14 days. Those arriving in the UK whose journey started from a country that is not on the list will still have to follow the isolation requirements. It is expected that the list will grow as time goes on. Rules on travel corridors will apply from 10 July onwards.

Members are reminded that anyone entering the UK (drivers included) is still required to fill the passenger locator form. In case of multiple entries in the UK within 48 hours, multiple journey can be included in the form. Drivers are still exempt from the isolation requirements.

Source: RHA

                                                                                                          

30.06.2020

On 28 June, the Government announced that the HGV Road User Levy, which is applied to HGVs of 12 tonnes or more, will be suspended for a year. The suspension runs from 1 August 2020 to 31 July 2021.
A Levy rate of zero will automatically apply at a vehicle’s normal VED/Levy renewal date from August onwards.
The suspension is applied to UK and overseas-registered HGVs using the UK’s roads.

Foreign operators who have already paid the levy as an annual payment will be able to claim a refund for the period 1 August 2020 to 31 July 2021, through their user account. Foreign operators who would normally ‘pay as they go’ will not be charged for use of the UK network between 1 August 2020 and 31 July 2021.

More information can be found here.

Source: RHA

                                                                                                          

26.06.2020

UK authorities have provided guidance in several languages about the contact locator form that individuals need to fill in upon entry into the UK territory.  Members are reminded that these documents have been drafted to cover all passengers, not only freight drivers. Whilst freight drivers are exempt from the 14-day self-isolation requirement, referred to in the document, they do have to fill in the form.

The following languages are available:

Members are reminded that the locator form can only be filled out online.

Sources: FTA and RHA

                                                                                                          

17.06.2020

Since 8 June, new border measures as well as a 14-day quarantine apply to most arrivals in the UK.

Drivers of goods vehicles and bus/coach drivers are exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement. Drivers have to demonstrate that their travel into the UK is part of their job. They can do this in a number of ways (e.g., a letter from their employer, a consignment note or the operator licence). UK authorities also confirmed that annex 3 is acceptable proof.

Even though they are exempt from quarantine, drivers will have to fill in an online locator form with their contact details and details of their journey. A recent update now allows drivers to complete the form for multiple journeys to the UK over a 48 hour period. UK authorities have confirmed that they are currently working to further improve the process for hauliers and freight workers, particularly for those travelling to and from the UK multiple times during a one-week period.

Official guidance is available here.

Source: FTA

                                                                                                          

12.06.2020

Following the enter into force of measures set out by the UK government earlier this week, members and drivers are reminded of the following:

  • Drivers need to prove that the travel is part of their job. This can be done by, for example, a letter from their employer, the EC International Workers Declaration, a consignment note or the operator’s licence.
  • In addition, the UK locator form must be completed by anyone arriving in the UK, including all professional drivers and freight workers. Other documents that drivers must have are the consignment note and the True Certified Copy of the Community Licence
  • The locator form declaration cannot be submitted more than 48 hours before the arrival in UK.

Source: RHA

                                                                                                          

05.06.2020

The UK has introduced new border measures that will be implemented from 8 June:

- Drivers of goods vehicles and bus/coach drivers will be exempt from the new 14-day quarantine requirement that will apply to most arrivals in the UK. Drivers will have to demonstrate that their travel into the UK is part of their job. They can do this in a number of ways, for example a letter from their employer, a consignment note or the operator licence would be acceptable. UK authorities provided an indicative template for a letter from the employer; using this template is not mandatory.

- Even though they are exempt from quarantine, drivers will have to fill in an online locator form with their contact details and details of their journey. Officials confirmed the “address” field will be optional. Drivers can complete the form no more than 48 hours in advance and will have to show either the digital version or the printed version of the form upon arrival at the UK border.

Official guidance is available here.

Source: FTA

                                                                                                           

02.06.2020

On 29 May, the British Government advised that the relaxations of the EU driving and rest times rules would cease to apply on 13 May, at 23:59. Therefore, Regulation (EC) 561/2006 fully applies from 1 June at 00:00. The relaxations of the GB driving and rest times rules have been extended to 14 June at 23:59, but will be kept under review. Further information can be found here.

Source: RHA

                                                                                                           

25.05.2020

The government has announced new plans for passengers arriving in the UK from abroad. As expected, these introduce new measures at the UK border to guard against a second wave of coronavirus (Covid-19) infections and include 14 days self-isolation for anyone entering the UK, bar a short list of exemptions.

FTA is pleased to confirm that road haulage and freight workers are exempt from the requirements in order to ensure the supply of goods is not impacted. Exemptions also include anyone travelling within the Common Travel Area, covering Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. The Home Office announcement may be found here.

Source: FTA

                                                                                                           

22.04.2020

In response to unprecedented pressures on local and national supply chains, the Department for Infrastructure has introduced a temporary and limited urgent relaxation of the enforcement of EU drivers’ hours rules in Northern Ireland. It has also introduced a temporary and limited urgent relaxation of the enforcement of NI drivers’ hours rules in Northern Ireland.

This relaxation began on 23 March 2020 and was due to end on 21 April 2020.

A specific review of the continuation of the relaxations past 21 April 2020 has been conducted and on the basis of the current evidence, a decision has been made to continue with the relaxations (apart from the relaxation on break requirements) until 23:59 on Sunday 31 May 2020.

The Department will keep these temporary arrangements under review and the relaxation may be amended or brought to an end earlier if circumstances change.

The Department would like to remind all transport operators and the customers who influence their practices that:


  • The standard drivers’ hours rules are important safety-related rules. They are in place to improve road safety and the working conditions of drivers, and reduce the risk of drivers being involved in fatigue-related accidents.
  • Therefore, these temporary relaxations should only be used where absolutely necessary. Operators should, wherever possible, attempt to recruit additional drivers from other sectors who are out of work or facing being furloughed
  • The temporary relaxations are designed to support the transport of vital goods, including the supply chains related to medicines, health, fuel, food and other necessities.


The current situation is being kept under review and the relaxation may be amended or withdrawn earlier than 31 May 2020 if circumstances change. Operators should use this period to increase resilience.

If any drivers or operators consider that they are being asked to use the relaxation without correct justification then they can email their concerns to drivershours@infrastructure-ni.gov.uk.

Retrospective checking of the use of these relaxations will take place as necessary, including by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Please note that the previous relaxation of the EU drivers’ hours rules on breaks (i.e. the requirements for daily breaks of 45 minutes after 4.5 hours driving replaced with a break of 45 minutes after 5.5 hours of driving) was applicable from 23 March 2020 until 21 April 2020 only.

Those wishing to use this relaxation should read the full notice here and must follow its requirements.


Source: FTA

                                                                                            

17.04.2020

Following a recent review of the current relaxation of the enforcement of the driver hours’ rules; which is due to end on 21 April, a decision has been made, based on the current evidence, to continue with the relaxations (apart from the relaxation on the EU break requirements) until 23:59 on Sunday 31 May.

 Detailed information has been provided by UK DFT and is available here.

Source: RHA

                                                                                                     

09.04.2020

In cases of non-resident drivers becoming unwell with the coronavirus (Covid-19) symptoms while in the UK, the national authorities recommend the following:

1. If emergency/clinical care is needed, an ambulance should be called;

2. The official guidelines must be followed, ie. immediate self-isolation; it is the responsibility of the freight company to safeguard employee well-being and therefore place them in suitable individual accommodation;

3. Foreign nationals can also approach their embassy for assistance;

4. In exceptional circumstances, depending on capacity, it may be possible to arrange accommodation at the London Isolation Centre.

Source: FTA

                                                                                                       

22.03.2020

The Department for Transport (DfT) has introduced a temporary and limited urgent relaxation of the enforcement of EU drivers’ hours rules in England, Scotland and Wales. It has also introduced a temporary and limited urgent relaxation of the enforcement of GB drivers’ hours rules in England, Scotland and Wales.

This applies to those undertaking carriage of goods by road in all sectors, between 00.01 on Monday 23 March and 23.59 on Tuesday 21 April (continuation of the relaxation past 5 April is subject to review).

The EU drivers’ hours rules can be temporarily relaxed as follows:

a)    Replacement of the EU daily driving limit of 9 hours with one of 11 hours.

b)    Reduction of the daily rest requirements from 11 to 9 hours.

c)    Lifting the weekly (56 hours) and fortnightly driving limits (90 hours) to 60 and 96 hours respectively.

d)    Postponement of the requirement to start a weekly rest period after six-24 hours periods, for after seven 24 hours period; although two regular weekly rest periods or a regular and a reduced weekly rest period will still be required within a fortnight.

e)    The requirements for daily breaks of 45 minutes after 4.5 hours driving replaced with replaced with a break of 45 minutes after 5.5 hours of driving.

Drivers must not use relaxation ‘a’ and ‘d’ at the same time. This is to ensure drivers are able to get adequate rest. DfT guidance can be found here.

From Monday 23 March all road user charging schemes in the capital will be temporarily suspended until further notice. This includes the Congestion Charge, the central London ULEZ and the London-wide LEZ.

Source: FTA

                                                                                                       

20.03.2020

The Department for Infrastructure (DfI) has issued notification of a relaxation in the drivers' hours rules for Northern-Ireland. This temporary relaxation applies from 00:01 on Wednesday 18 March 2020 and will run until 23:59 on Thursday 16 April 2020. Initially, this will apply for the drivers of vehicles involved in the delivery of food, non-food (personal care and household paper and cleaning) and over the counter pharmaceuticals when undertaking the following journeys:

- Distribution centre to stores (or fulfilment centre).

- From manufacturer or supplier to distribution centre (including backhaul collections).

- From manufacturer or supplier to store (or fulfilment centre).

- Between distribution centres and transport hub trunking.

- Transport hub deliveries to stores.

This exemption does not apply to drivers undertaking deliveries directly to consumers.

Operators are reminded that this relaxation does not excuse them from their duty of care to drivers and that drivers should not be allowed or required to drive whilst tired. Operators seeking to use the exemption should read the DfI notice in detail; this can be found here.

Source: FTA

                                                                                                       

18.03.2020

On March 17th, the government has taken new measures, which include advising British nationals against all non-essential international travel.

The advice against non-essential travel is not intended to apply to international and domestic freight transport. Thus, haulage continues under no extra restrictions in the UK officially.

A guidance note on Coronavirus (Covid-19) and freight transport has been published by the UK Department for Transport

Sources: RHA and FTA