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Source: European Union/Re-open EU

06.05.2021

From an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country, may I enter this country without being subject to extraordinary restrictions?

No


Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU "traffic lights" approach to travel restrictions.


Is a coronavirus test required?

All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or 'not detected' result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

In case of lack of a negative or 'not detected' RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.


Is a quarantine required?

All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

If you come into Ireland from any country deemed 'high risk', or If you come to Ireland without a negative or 'not detected' PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed 'high risk', you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or 'not detected' PCR test.

If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or 'not detected', your period of quarantine can end.

If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.


Passenger Locator Form

All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form


Find out more:
gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic


What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?




Is a coronavirus test required?

Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or 'not detected' result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

In case of lack of a negative or 'not detected' RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

Children aged 6 and under are exempted.


Is a quarantine required?

All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

If you come into Ireland from any country deemed 'high risk', or If you come to Ireland without a negative or 'not detected' PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed 'high risk', you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or 'not detected' PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or 'not detected', your period of quarantine can end.

If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.


Passenger Locator Form

All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form


May I transit this country?


Yes


As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.


General measures



Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead is a revised plan for living with COVID-19. The plan uses 5 levels of restriction that correspond to the severity of COVID-19 in a location.

Level 1 is for locations where COVID-19 is the least severe, Level 5 is for locations where COVID-19 is most severe.

Every county in Ireland is currently on Level 5:

  • Two households can meet outdoors, away from their gardens;
  • You can travel within your county or within 20km of your home;
  • If you are fully vaccinated, you can meet with another fully vaccinated person indoors. You are fully vaccinated:
    • 15 days after the second AstraZeneca dose
    • 7 days after the second Pfizer-BioNtech dose
    • 14 days after the second Moderna dose

Restrictions on travel to Ireland are in place. If you travel to Ireland from certain countries you have to pay for mandatory hotel quarantine.

A schedule for reopenings is available. This schedule may vary depending on the evolution of the epidemiological situation.

From 4 May:

  • All construction work can fully recommence;
  • Residents in nursing homes where at least 8 out of 10 residents have been fully vaccinated can have 4 routine visits per week. This applies where residents have been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks. Residents of all other nursing homes are allowed to have 2 visits per week.

From 10 May:

  • People from 3 households can meet outdoors (including in a garden), or 6 people from any number of households;
  • Fully-vaccinated people can meet with one other household (that includes non-vaccinated people) indoors;
  • Hairdressers, barbers and other personal services can reopen by appointment;
  • Non-essential shops can offer click and collect services by appointment. Outdoor retail, like gardening centres, can reopen;
  • Outdoor training can start for adults in pods of up to 15;
  • Church services can be held (this does not include communions and confirmations);
  • Museums, galleries, libraries and other indoor cultural activities can reopen;
  • Outdoor organised events can take place with up to 15 people in attendance;
  • Weddings can have 50 people at the service. Up to 15 can go to outdoor wedding celebrations and up to 6 can attend indoors;
  • Funeral services can have up to 50 mourners.

From 17 May:

  • All non-essential shops can reopen

From 2 June:

  • Hotels and bed and breakfasts can reopen services for guests only.

From 7 June:

  • You can have visitors to your home from one other household;
  • Restaurants, bars and pubs can reopen for outdoor service for groups of up to 6 people;
  • Gyms, swimming pools and leisure centres can reopen;
  • Sports matches can be held without an audience.


Find out more:
New public health measures announced: The Path Ahead (www.gov.ie)


Use of facemasks


Face coverings are mandatory in retail outlets, in taxis, in bus and rail stations, on public transport and for workers in customer facing roles in cafés, bars and restaurants.

Physical Distancing


physical distancing of at least 2 metres should be respected.


Source: https://reopen.europa.eu/en/map/IRL/7001

                                                                                                     

31.03.2021

From an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country, may I enter this country without being subject to extraordinary restrictions?


NO


Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU "traffic lights" approach to travel restrictions.


Is a coronavirus test required?

All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or 'not detected' result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

In case of lack of a negative or 'not detected' RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.


Is a quarantine required?

All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

If you come into Ireland from any country deemed 'high risk', or If you come to Ireland without a negative or 'not detected' PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed 'high risk', you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or 'not detected' PCR test.

If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or 'not detected', your period of quarantine can end.

If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.


Passenger Locator Form

All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form


Find out more:
gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

Documents you need to travel in Europe


What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?




Is a coronavirus test required?

Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or 'not detected' result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

In case of lack of a negative or 'not detected' RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

Children aged 6 and under are exempted.


Is a quarantine required?

All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

If you come into Ireland from any country deemed 'high risk', or If you come to Ireland without a negative or 'not detected' PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed 'high risk', you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or 'not detected' PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or 'not detected', your period of quarantine can end.

If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.


Passenger Locator Form

All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form


Find out more:
gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic


May I transit this country?


YES


As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.



General measures



Ireland has established a Plan for living with COVID-19.

This plan sets out 5 levels that correspond to the severity of COVID-19 in a location. Different levels can be in place in different locations in the country.

Level 1 is for locations where COVID-19 is the least severe and means that restrictions on the activities of people and businesses are at their lowest level. Level 5 is for locations where COVID-19 is most severe and means that restrictions on the activities of people and businesses are at their highest level.

Level 5 is currently in place

Every county in Ireland is on alert Level 5 in the 'Plan for living with COVID-19' from 1 December 2020.

Measures in place at Level 5

Health cover for temporary stays


Use of facemasks


Face coverings are mandatory in retail outlets, in taxis, in bus and rail stations, on public transport and for workers in customer facing roles in cafés, bars and restaurants.

Physical Distancing


physical distancing of at least 2 metres should be respected.


Source: https://reopen.europa.eu/en/map/IRL/7001

                                                                                                     


26.01.2021

From an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country, may I enter this country without being subject to extraordinary restrictions?


Partially


Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU "traffic lights" approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

From 16 January 2021, passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

In general, you are also requested to restrict your movements for 14 days if you arrive in Ireland from another country. This applies to all travellers entering the State, including Irish citizens coming home and people with no symptoms.

Restricting your movements means avoiding contact with other people and social situations as much as possible.

In line with the EU traffic lights approach, the request to restrict movements does not apply to travellers from green regions, or those arriving from Northern Ireland.

Currently, all passengers entering Ireland from orange, red, and grey regions are requested to restrict their movements for 14 days. This period of restricted movement can end if you receive a negative result of a PCR test that has been taken a minimum of five days after your arrival in Ireland. You should wait for your negative test result to be returned before ending the period of restricted movements.

This general request to restrict movement for 14 days does not apply to certain defined categories.

Passenger Locator Form

If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

Find out more:
gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

Documents you need to travel in Europe


What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?




From 9 January 2021, all passengers arriving at Irish airports and ports whose journey originates in Great Britain or South Africa will be requested to have evidence of a negative result from a pre-departure PCR COVID-19 test (COVID-19 not detected) taken up to 72 hours prior to arrival in Ireland.

International Transport Workers, including workers in aviation, maritime and road haulage sectors, are exempt from this requirement.

See also:
Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

____________________

For travel from non-EU/EEA countries, the general request to restrict your movements for 14 days does not apply to certain defined categories, as indicated below:

(a) International Transport Workers, including workers in aviation, maritime and road haulage sectors

(b) Travellers with an essential function or need as set out in paragraph 19 of the EU Council Recommendation, including:

I. Passengers travelling for the purposes of an imperative business reason, only while carrying out that essential function

II. Passengers arriving for imperative family reasons, only while pursuing that imperative reason

III. Returning passengers, who have carried out an essential function in another region, but who have otherwise restricted their movement while in that region

The approach to post-arrival testing for red/grey regions in the ECDC categorisation will also apply to arrivals from all non-EU/EEA countries from 29 November 2020.


Passenger Locator Form

If you arrive into Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.



May I enter this country by sea transport?

Partially

From 9 January 2021, all passengers arriving at Irish airports and ports whose journey originates in Great Britain or South Africa will be requested to have evidence of a negative result from a pre-departure PCR COVID-19 test (COVID-19 not detected) taken up to 72 hours prior to arrival in Ireland.

International Transport Workers, including workers in aviation, maritime and road haulage sectors, are exempt from this requirement.

See also:
Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)


General measures



Ireland has established a Plan for living with COVID-19.

This plan sets out 5 levels that correspond to the severity of COVID-19 in a location. Different levels can be in place in different locations in the country.

Level 1 is for locations where COVID-19 is the least severe and means that restrictions on the activities of people and businesses are at their lowest level. Level 5 is for locations where COVID-19 is most severe and means that restrictions on the activities of people and businesses are at their highest level.

Level 5 is currently in place

Every county in Ireland is on alert Level 5 in the 'Plan for living with COVID-19' from 1 December 2020.

Measures in place at Level 5

Health cover for temporary stays


Use of facemasks


Face coverings are mandatory in retail outlets, in taxis, in bus and rail stations, on public transport and for workers in customer facing roles in cafés, bars and restaurants.

Physical Distancing


physical distancing of at least 2 meters should be respected.


Source: https://reopen.europa.eu/en/map/IRL/6001

                                                                                                     


15.12.2020

From an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country, may I enter this country without being subject to extraordinary restrictions?


PARTIALLY


Ireland is implementing the new EU 'traffic lights' approach to travel, which applies to countries in the EU / EEA (+ UK).

In general, you are requested to restrict your movements for 14 days if you arrive into Ireland from another country. This applies to all travellers entering the State, including Irish citizens coming home and people with no symptoms.

Restricting your movements means avoiding contact with other people and social situations as much as possible.

In line with the EU traffic lights approach, the request to restrict movements does not apply to travellers from green regions, or those arriving from Northern Ireland.

Currently, all passengers entering Ireland from orange, red, and grey regions are requested to restrict their movements for 14 days. This period of restricted movement can end if you receive a negative/'not detected' result of a PCR test that has been taken a minimum of five days after your arrival in Ireland. You should wait for your negative test result to be returned before ending the period of restricted movements.

This general request to restrict movement for 14 days does not apply to certain defined categories.

What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?


For travel from non-EU/EEA countries, the general request to restrict your movements for 14 days does not apply to certain defined categories, as indicated below:

(a) International Transport Workers, including workers in aviation, maritime and road haulage sectors

(b) Travellers with an essential function or need as set out in paragraph 19 of the EU Council Recommendation, including:

I. Passengers travelling for the purposes of an imperative business reason, only while carrying out that essential function

II. Passengers arriving for imperative family reasons, only while pursuing that imperative reason

III. Returning passengers, who have carried out an essential function in another region, but who have otherwise restricted their movement while in that region

The approach to post-arrival testing for red/grey regions in the ECDC categorisation will also apply to arrivals from all non-EU/EEA countries from 29 November 2020.

What are the rules if I go abroad from this country, and when I return from abroad?


From Monday 9 November, Ireland is implementing the new EU 'traffic lights' approach to travel, which applies to countries in the EU / EEA.

The current advice for travel to these countries is 'exercise a high degree of caution'. The general advice for any other overseas travel remains 'avoid non-essential travel' or in some cases, 'do not travel'.

More information at: gov.ie - Travelling outside of Ireland

Travel Advice by Country


Passenger Locator Form

If you arrive into Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.


Find out more:

gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

Documents you need to travel in Europe


                                                                                                     


14.09.2020

Entry Restrictions


COVID-19 green list is reviewed on a fortnightly basis.


Travel to a very limited set of locations (COVID-19 green list) is exempted from the general advice against non-essential travel overseas. Individuals arriving into Ireland from these locations will not be requested to restrict their movements upon entry.


Passengers from any other location not on this list are asked to restrict their movements for 14 days. The general advice against non-essential travel includes Great Britain but does not apply to Northern Ireland.


Travelling to Ireland from a location that is on the COVID-19 green list

Travelling to Ireland from a location that is NOT on the COVID-19 green list


Travelling from (or returning to) Ireland
Travelling abroad from Ireland
Travel advice by country from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.


Rules and Exceptions
The Irish Authorities advise anyone coming into Ireland, apart from Northern Ireland and from locations with a security rating of "normal precautions" (green), to restrict their movements for 14 days. This includes citizens and residents returning to Ireland. Restricting your movements means staying indoors in one location and avoiding contact with other people and social situations as much as possible.

Before starting your journey, please check visa requirements at www.inis.gov.ie.


Mandatory Travel Documentation
COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form


Find out more
COVID-19 Travel Advice
Driving abroad


Source: https://reopen.europa.eu/en/map/IRL

Source: European Commission

07.04.2020

Support measures for strategic maritime connections to Ireland 

The Irish Government has announced the designation, on a temporary basis only, of five strategic maritime routes into and out of Ireland as Public Service Obligation (PSO) routes during COVID-19 for a period of up to three months. These are Dublin/Cherbourg and Rosslare/Fishguard, Pembroke, Cherbourg and Bilbao, with the emergency provision of a maximum contribution of €15 million towards the costs involved in the continued operation of passenger ferry services on these routes in that period. The operators currently providing these services are Irish Ferries, Stena Line and Brittany Ferries.

Further information: 
https://www.gov.ie/en/news/fb9743-government-support-measure...

More info:
https://www.gov.ie/en/campaigns/c36c85-covid-19-coronavirus/

Source: https://ec.europa.eu/transport/coronavirus-response_en

Quarantine of 14 days for travellers coming to Ireland (16.03.2020)

Anyone coming into Ireland, apart from Northern Ireland, will be required to restrict their movements on arrival for 14 days. This includes Irish residents. Essential supply chain services such as hauliers, pilots and maritime staff are exempt.

Start date: 16.03.2020

End date: not available

Further information: https://www.dfa.ie/travel/travel-advice/coronavirus/

Temporary and limited relaxation of the enforcement of driving and rest times for the drivers of vehicles engaged in goods transport

Ireland has notified a temporary and limited relaxation of the enforcement of driving and rest times for the drivers of vehicles engaged in goods transport. This relaxation is granted pursuant to Article 14(2) of Regulation (EC) No 561/2006. It will apply to those drivers involved in domestic and international transport.

Start date: 18.03.2020

End date: 16.04.2020

further information: https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/transport/files/temporary-relaxatio...





Remarks from the International Road Transport Union

08.02.2021

IRHA, our Irish association has informed that the Holmestown testing site in Wexford is now open for testing. 

The revised timings are as follows:

Dublin Blue Carpark: Monday to Saturday 8:00 hrs -19:00 hrs plus on Sunday 07 February & 21 February 10:00 hrs  - 14:00 hrs

Gorey Until 07 February: Monday to Friday 11:00 hrs - 22:00 hrs  Saturday 10:00 hrs - 21:00 hrs

Gorey from 08 February: Monday to Friday 9:00 hrs  – 20:00 hrs. Saturdays 9:30 hrs - 20:30 hrs

Holmestown, Wexford: Monday to Friday 12:00 hrs - 20:00 hrs , Saturdays 10:00 hrs - 21:00 hrs

Please note the importance of pre-booking an appointment with RocDoc at www.covidcheck.ie

Details of how to register and book an appointment can be found in the FAQ. A copy of the document is attached.

The updated FAQ can also be found here.

Source: IRHA

                                                                                                     

Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak: All UK passport holders to have Covid-19 Test report to enter France from Ireland

The French Authorities have directed that all UK passport holders entering France from Ireland will need to present printed evidence of a negative result from a privately undertaken (not NHS) pre-departure COVID-19 PCR or other antigen test taken up to 72 hours prior to their arrival.

A COVID-19 Declaration Form must also be completed. UK passport holders who permanently reside in the Irish Republic are exempt but must have proof of Irish residence (e.g. scanned utility bill).

 - The French decree extending the testing regime states that all people coming from the UK should present a declaration saying that they do not have Covid symptoms and that they have not been in contact with a confirmed case in the 14 days preceding their journey and be in possession of a negative PCR / Antigen Covid test taken less than 72 hours before embarking on their journey. The test has to be carried out on British territory (includes NI).

 - HGV/LCV drivers arriving in Cherbourg with UK passports are now being asked to prove that they are resident in Ireland to be allowed into France without a negative COVID test. The French authorities are aware that a driver could hold a UK passport and still work and live in the South. If the driver can prove by showing proof of address in Ireland – a scanned version of a utility bill etc. - they will be allowed in without proof of a negative test. There have been a number of cases of UK passport holders driving Irish trucks and who could prove they lived in Ireland that have been allowed in.

 - Drivers with UK passports driving NI registered trucks or working for NI haulage companies may have more difficulty in entering France. They risk being sent back if they do not have a valid PCR / antigen test.

The list of antigen tests approved by France is available here.
Source: Motis/AFTRI

                                                                                                     

22.04.2020

On 20 April, the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport announced details of the legislative steps he has taken in support of the necessary closure of a range of Road Safety Authority services as result of the ongoing Covid-19 situation.

Under the new measures, the following have come into effect in relation to vehicle testing:

  • NCT vehicles with a test that was or will be due on or after 28 March 2020 have that test date extended by 4 months
  • Commercial Vehicle Roadworthiness Tests (CVRT) – vehicles with a test that was or will be due on or after 28 March have that test date extended by 3 months

The Minister has also taken the following steps in relation to driver licensing:

  • Driving licences due to expire between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 inclusive have had their date of expiry extended by 4 months
  • Learner permits due to expire between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 inclusive have had their date of expiry extended by 4 months
  • Driver Theory Test certificates due to expire between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 inclusive have had that date extended by 4 months
  • Certificates of Competency – issued when people pass a driving test and required when applying for a first full driving licence - due to expire between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 inclusive have had that date extended by 4 months
  • Initial Basic Training certificates for motorcycle learners due to expire between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 inclusive have had that date extended by 4 months


In addition, and in line with the arrangements previously in place for NCT certificates in relation to private cars, it will no longer be necessary to have a current Certificate of Roadworthiness (CRW) in order to tax a commercial vehicle. Companies should be able to renew the motor tax for a commercial vehicle from 21 April without need of a CRW.

Source: IRHA

                                                                                                     

16.04.2020

On 15 April, the Irish department of transport agreed to relax rules on driving and rest times for a further 6 weeks. Exemptions will apply from 17 April to 31 May for all haulage activity within the republic of Ireland and are as follows:

- Art. 6.3: the fortnightly driving limit is increased from 90 to 112 hours.

- Art. 8.4: the maximum of three reduced daily rest periods between any two weekly rest periods is increased from three to five; if a driver reaches the maximum of five in the first five days following the end of the previous weekly rest period, and then continues to drive on the sixth consecutive day, his daily log must not exceed thirteen hours for day six.

- Art. 8.6: The current weekly rest rules will continue to apply, but no compensation will be required for a reduced weekly rest period. In any two consecutive weeks, drivers must continue to take at least either two regular weekly rest periods, or one regular weekly rest period and one reduced weekly rest period of at least 24 hours, whilst ensuring that the weekly rest period starts no later than six 24 hour periods from the end of the previous weekly rest period.

- Art. 8.8: possibility for the driver to take the regular weekly rest in the vehicle, as long as it has suitable sleeping facilities for each driver and the vehicle is stationary.

Source: IRHA

                                                                                                       

Restrictions

The Irish Government have issued special advice about travelling, including restricting movements for 14 days on those entering Ireland who have been to affected areas. Freight transport is exempted. The government published a guidance note for supply chain workers. This document contains about one and half pages of useful guidelines for drivers.

To reduce the risk of infection, the ferry company Seatruck Ferries has temporarily stopped shipping any HGV drivers or any other passengers in their Irish Sea vessels. Accompanied road transport (complete truck combinations with driver) is then stopped until further notice, but the company will continue to carry unaccompanied semi-trailers, containers and swap bodies.

Relieves

In response to the extraordinary crisis due to the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19), Ireland has agreed to a temporary and limited relaxation of the enforcement of driving and rest times rules for the drivers of vehicles engaged in domestic and international goods transport. This relaxation is granted pursuant to Article 14(2) of Regulation (EC) No 561/2006 and applies from 18 March 2020 and will run until 16 April 2020, provided that road safety is not affected [impaired] when transport companies make use of these exemptions. Employers remain responsible for the health and safety of their employees and other road users. For the above mentioned category of drivers, the following provisions will be temporarily relaxed as follows:


  • Derogation to Art. 6(3): the fortnightly driving limit is lifted from 90 hours to 112 hours.
  • Derogation to the Art. 8(6): in any two consecutive weeks a driver shall take at least two reduced weekly rest periods whilst maintaining the rule that a weekly rest period shall start no later than at the end of six 24-hour periods from the end of the previous weekly rest period. There shall be no requirement for compensation or for a regular weekly rest period to be taken.

Source: IRHA


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